Women's experience of termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly: effects of socio-political evolutions in France - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Prenatal Diagnosis Year : 2011

Women's experience of termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly: effects of socio-political evolutions in France

Abstract

Objective To analyse the experiences of women facing a termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly (TOPFA) in relation to decisional aspects, attitudes towards the fetus' body and the effects of postpartum depression. The method is based on a two-stage questionnaire given to 120 women who underwent a TOPFA between 2005 and 2006 in a Parisian Prenatal Diagnosis Department and compared to a similar study carried out in 1999 in the same department. Results In 2005, 68/120 women (57%) compared to 32/103 (32%) in 99 (p < 0.001) believed that the decision of pregnancy termination belongs to couples and doctors together. However, in advanced pregnancy or fetal pathology related to mental deficiency, a higher proportion of women believe that the decision should belong to the parents alone. In 2005, 66% of the women (78/118) compared to (42/103) 41% in 1999 (p < 0.001), chose to see their fetus after the termination. Postpartum depression score was positive in one third of the 2005 series and higher in younger women. Conclusion Our study suggests that women differentiate between various decision-making actors depending on the type of pregnancy termination. The differences observed between 1999 and 2005 suggest a strong interaction between women's experiences, legislation and practices. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Dates and versions

hal-03477675 , version 1 (13-12-2021)

Identifiers

Cite

Véronique Mirlesse, F Perrotte, F Kieffer, Isabelle Ville. Women's experience of termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly: effects of socio-political evolutions in France. Prenatal Diagnosis, 2011, 31 (11), pp.1021-1028. ⟨10.1002/pd.2825⟩. ⟨hal-03477675⟩
18 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More